1940 was extremely medium

Ask any self-proclaimed European, or Louis C. K. impersonator, and they'll tell you that North Americans have, of late, been taking things a smidge to the extreme. They'll tell you that we find run-of-the-mill, everyday occurrences to be "the greatest," or "the worst," or "amaze-balls," or "fml," or "mega-fly," or "totes the dope-on-a-rope!" That was a super long list.

As it turns out, the English language extremely agrees to the max. Results from Google Ngram searches show that we've been using medium-meaning adjectives (medium included) less and less over the past few decades. The majority of medium-meaning adjectives are on the decline in the English language:

Usage of medium-meaning words in 1940 compared to 2008. Data from  Google Ngram

Usage of medium-meaning words in 1940 compared to 2008. Data from Google Ngram

Like any rational reductionist, I blame Trump. #MakeMediumGreatAgain 

Word usage that has also decreased since 1940:

common, usual, normal, routine, commonplace, middle, regular, routine, standard, midmost, median, sufficient, sufficing, inmost.

Word usage that has actually gone up since 1940:

intermediary, central, conventional, modest, so-so, halfway, midsize, medial, in-between, tolerable.